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Tuesday, July 7, 2020 | History

3 edition of The Douglas-fir tussock moth problem in the Northwest found in the catalog.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth problem in the Northwest

The Douglas-fir tussock moth problem in the Northwest

status, impacts, and alternatives for 1974.

  • 330 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Cooperative Extension Service, Washington State University in Pullman, Wa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas-fir tussock moth,
  • Douglas fir -- Diseases and pests

  • Edition Notes

    Cover title.

    SeriesExtension mimeo -- 3816., Extension mimeo (Washington State University. Cooperative Extension Service) -- 3816.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination18 p. :
    Number of Pages18
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17611242M
    OCLC/WorldCa36953781

    Treatment Options for Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth About Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a defoliator of Douglas-fir, true fir (Abies spp.) and spruce (Engelmann and Colorado blue) trees. Native to Colorado’s forests, the insect also may impact Colorado blue spruce in urban settings. Orgyia pseudotsugata Pest description and crop damage The adult moth flies during the day and is brown to gray, about 1 inch across. Mature Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga)-Douglas-fir tussock moth | Pacific Northwest Pest Management Handbooks.

    Other Common Names/Trade Names: None Scientific Name: Pseudotsuga menziesii Best Characteristics for Identification: Characteristic "plywood" odor. Scattered resin canals Uses: Plywood, construction lumber. General Natural Range: Two distinct populations. Coastal population extends from central British Columbia south to central California.   Identification of parasites of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, based on adults, cocoons, and puparia by Torgersen, Torolf R. cn; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.); United Service. cn.

    The production and persistence of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata, has been determined by periodic sampling of a series of natural and induced have demonstrated that low prevalence rates during the early instars result mainly in larval mortality of older instars which ultimately leads to the greatest production and persistence Cited by: Douglas-fir tussock moth control by the homeowner (Oregon State University. Extension Service. FS) [Joseph Capizzi] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Joseph Capizzi.


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The Douglas-fir tussock moth problem in the Northwest Download PDF EPUB FB2

Orgyia pseudotsugata (Douglas-fir tussock moth) is a moth of the subfamily Lymantriinae found in western North America. Its population periodically irrupts in cyclical caterpillars feed on the needles of Douglas fir, true fir, and spruce in summer, and Family: Erebidae.

Most Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreaks occur east of the Cascade Mountains crest in mixed conifer stands having high proportions of Douglas-fir, grand fir, or white fir. In northern Washington, Douglas-fir is the preferred host, while elsewhere in Washington and Oregon, Douglas-fir, white fir, and grand fir are equally preferred.

The Lymantriinae (formerly called the Lymantriidae) are a subfamily of moths of the family Erebidae. Many of its component species are referred to as "tussock moths" of one sort or another. The caterpillar, or larval, stage of these species often has a distinctive Class: Insecta.

Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a native defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and true firs (Abies spp.), though will rarely feed on planted Colorado blue spruce in urban moth is a native species found throughout mixed-conifer forests in the western United States and southern British Columbia.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is an important defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region.

Feeding by the larvae can cause complete defoliation of heavily infested trees. Damage usually appears first in the tops of trees and progresses downward, sometimes over several years.

th0 Douglas fir tussock moth in the Pacific fior4hwe/t A SEMINAR SEMINAR CHAIRMAN Henry J. Korp Deputy Assistant Administrator for Pesticide Programs U.S. Environmental Protection Agency PROGRAM COMMITTEE Roger Pierpont, Entomologist Ecological Effects Branch, Criteria and Evaluation Division Office of Pesticide Programs, U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency Washington. Hosts: Douglas-fir, white fir and spruce Figure 8. Adult male (left) and femail (right) Douglas-fir moth. Symptoms/Signs: The caterpillar of the Douglas-fir tussock moth is grayish with brightly colored tufts of hair and a shiny black are also two long horns of black hairs behind the head and another at the rear of the body.

Orgyia pseudotsugata. Pest description and damage The adult male is brown to gray and about 1 inch across and flies during the day in search of the wingless female moth.

The larvae feed on pine needles and the mature larvae are about an inch long, hairy, gray or light brown, with black heads.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a common and periodically destructive solitary defoliator. Occasionally, localized outbreaks occur on individual or small groups of Douglas-fir or spruce in urban settings both on the coast and in the interior.

Severe defoliation by the tussock moth may result in tree mortality, top-kill or weakened trees, making.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth problem in the Northwest: status, impacts, and alternatives for / (Portland, Or.: The Committee, ), by Interagency Tussock Moth Steering Committee (page images at HathiTrust; US access only).

The Douglas-fir tussock moth, a native moth to the Sierra Nevadas, has fluctuating populations that, at times, burst with upsurges.

The insect, during the caterpillar phase, defoliates Yosemite's white fir trees. Douglas-fir is the name of an entire genus of trees that contains six species--two native to North America and four native to eastern Asia. Because of its similarity to other genera, Douglas-fir has given botanists fits.

It has, at various times, been called a pine, a spruce, a hemlock, and a true fir. Douglas-fir, white fir, and grand fir are all equally acceptable. In the south (California, Nevada, Arizona, and Figure 1. -- Distrubution of host type where Douglas-fir tussock moth may be found and location of outbreaks.

trees, brush, and buildings, but once an outbreak subsides, finding caterpil-lars is difficult. Defoliation by the tussock moth. Title. Mammoth Lakes revisited, 50 years after a Douglas-fir Tussock Moth outbreak / Related Titles.

Series: Research note PNW ; By. Wickman, Boyd E. Starr, G. Lynn. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a destructive native defoliator of Douglas-fir.

Outbreaks of tussock moth occur every ten to twelve years causing significant damage and mortality to Douglas-fir stands in the interior of the province. These outbreaks tend to last up to four years before natural controls such as predators, parasites, pathogens. Successful management of the Douglas-fir tussock moth depends on carefully monitoring populations within high-hazard stands during the non-outbreak and building phases.

Once an outbreak begins, viable treatment options decrease significantly. Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth- and Douglas-Fir Beetle-Caused Mortality in a Ponderosa Pine/Douglas-Fir Forest in the Colorado Front Range, USA José F. Negrón 1,*, Ann M. Lynch 2, Willis C. Schaupp Jr. 3 and Javier E.

Mercado 1 1 Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Cited by: 1. Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Biology and Life Cycle (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth and Tussockosis (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Treatment and Control In My Backyard (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth NPV Virus Information Sheet (PDF) History of Douglas-fir Tussock Moth in South-East BC (PDF) DFTM Treatment Maps; Back to Douglas-fir Tussock Moth.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseuclot-sugata, is one of the most injurious insect pests of Douglas-fir and true firs found in the West.

Out-breaks may develop explosively and when they do, the caterpillars will attack less preferred species such as pine, larch, spruce, and other species inter-mixed with Douglas-fir or true firs.

Life. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native defoliator of Douglas-fir, true firs (such as grand fir) and spruce. For reasons unknown, a year or two prior to an outbreak of Douglas-fir tussock moth on forested land, we tend to see defoliation of ornamental trees such as blue spruce.

Douglas-fircan cause problems because the larval hairs tussockMovement of Douglas-fir tussock moth into moth during outbreaks. ©Colorado State University Extension.

3/ Revised 7/ Caterpillars of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), chew the needles of spruces, Douglas fir and true firs.Instar development of the Douglas-fir tussock moth in relation to field temperatures / Related Titles.

Series: Research note PNW ; By. Beckwith, R. C. Grimble, David G. Weatherby, Julie C. Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.) Type. Book Material. Published material.

Publication info.Adult Douglas-fir tussock moth male. He is a dull, brown-gray, ordinary looking moth. Table 1. Total Volume Decline l of Tree Mortality with [no treatment) Natural Degree of defoliation Estimate Class 1, Intensive Class II, Moderate Class III, Light Class IV, None OSU low1 Percent 84 84 Percent 16 19 34 Percent 0 Percent 0.